Regex: Grouping expressions of a kind

I was recently presented with a task: I had a CSV database dump that I had to turn back into MySQL queries of a different format. My toolset was everything that Sublime Text 3 had to offer (which is a lot of great tools) – though eventually it was narrowed down to a plugin and ST3’s macro functionality – and the awesome power of regular expressions. As I was working on this task, however, I ran into a problem which took me a few hours to resolve – but its solution is interesting, and in my opinion deserving of an article. Continue reading Regex: Grouping expressions of a kind

Russian: Common Pitfalls

For someone whose native language is not Slavic, Russian is not an easy language to master. There is little in common between your language’s vocabulary and Russian’s, the grammar is different and the syntax is a mystery wrapped in an enigma. It’s only natural, therefore, that you make mistakes – and that is fine. Whenever you make mistakes, you are practising the language, and any practice is useful. Of course, there’s no learning without having those mistakes corrected – and that’s where this post comes in. I will try to clear up some of the common mistakes made by beginner and lower intermediate learners, which will hopefully make it easier for you to get better practice and move on to other topics in the language. Continue reading Russian: Common Pitfalls

Russian: Going Places

Movement is a broad and deep topic in Russian – indeed, Russian verbs of motion are one of the things that trouble students most. But prepositions are another very important component of expressing ideas of movement, especially because their often differs from English. This article will deal with some of the most common verbs of motion along with how to use them with prepositions, as well as a little about expressing where you are.

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Russian: Partitive Genitive

You may have encountered this strange occurrence when reading Russian literature or hearing speech: people say выпить чаю, поесть супа or налить квасу. You may think that’s wrong, since these verbs should govern the accusative, and these are… genitive and dative? After all, it’s пить чай, not пить чаю!
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